Nutrition, Vitamins
The Essential Minerals Guide for Party Girls | Nutrition Gone Wild

The Party Girl’s Guide to Minerals

Everything You Need to Know About Minerals. 

Okay, so we now know ALL about vitamins. 

At the very least, hopefully you skimmed over it for the most important parts. You know, the same way you read your college textbooks…

If you didn’t read the vitamin guide, you can check it out here.

Anyway, there are these other compounds called minerals that you also need in order to stay healthy.

I’m not talking about minerals that make for big pretty rock-like jewelry…as much as I love a good geode mineral piece…

You most likely know that your body needs these minerals, but only a few of them you are well informed about. Everyone on the planet at this point knows you need calcium to build bones, but what is chloride (not the stuff for your pool) actually used for ?

Let’s learn a little more about our minerals!

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Macro Minerals

 

Calcium

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Why do you need it?

In 2010 when the U.S. federal government released their healthy goals for the country, only 32% of U.S. adults met the adequate intake (AI) for calcium in the previous decade. It’s also important to consider vitamin D intake when we talk about calcium because you need vitamin D to absorb calcium. With intakes of both so low, our bones are going to be real unhappy…

Calcium functions to build strong bones and teeth. DUH! (okay not trying to be rude, I just know you know that part. The next part is a bit more complicated though…

Calcium plays a role in allowing your muscles to contract.

Without getting too fancy in the explanation, your muscles contain fibers that rely on calcium concentration movements in order to contract. Your brain sends the signal to move the muscles, but if the calcium needed to make a movement isn’t there, your body is going to have a real hard time making any movement.

Luckily, your bones store your calcium so you can borrow from them like a loan from a bank…

But this not something you want to happen too often. If you don’t get adequate calcium intake, your bones will lose calcium stores and become weak and brittle. Later in life this loss will more greatly impact your life, especially if you are a woman. After menopause, women lose about 1% of their bone mass every year. Peak bone mass is typically reached at age 30. So if you think about it, you need to think about building healthy bones earlier in life to set yourself up for better bone health later in life.

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Calcium

  • Dark leafy greens
  • Low-fat milk
  • Low-fat yogurt
  • Fortified soy products
  • Broccoli
  • Okra
  • Almonds
  • Sardines
  • Snap peas

 

What about Calcium and alcohol?

Alcohol interferes with the pancreas and liver functions which can affect calcium and vitamin D. Alcohol inhibits calcium absorption which helps the pancreas release enzymes required for normal digestion. When alcohol inhibits the activation of vitamin D in the kidneys, it causes a lower rate of calcium absorption due to the inadequate vitamin D. Alcohol also kills off osteoblasts, the body’s bone building cells.

The good news is that studies have shown that if you decrease alcohol consumption and get adequate nutrition, your bones can partially recover your losses.

 

Potassium

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Why do you need it?

Potassium, like sodium, chloride, calcium, and magnesium, is an electrolyte. Electrolytes conduct electricity in the body to perform many different jobs. Potassium in particular is crucial in the proper functioning of the heart, as well as normal muscle contractions of both smooth and skeletal muscle. Dysfunction of the muscles can cause digestive issues, heart problems, and fatigue.

In the United States, less than 2% of the population gets adequate potassium due to low plant food consumption among Americans. Even if you get half of the daily recommended value, studies have shown a decrease in the risk of stroke by 21%. Studies have also shown that high potassium diets are associated with better bone health outcomes. Potassium shows promise in the prevention of osteoporosis through it’s role in preventing urine excretion of calcium.

Like I discussed with calcium, getting adequate potassium as a young person makes for a better bone health outcome in the future. Diets high in potassium and calcium when you are young will essentially cushion your bone loss as you reach elderly years. You have to think ahead to your future when it comes to these essential minerals.

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Potassium

  • Beans (White, Soy, Lima, Kidney, Pinto)
  • Spinach
  • Potato and sweet potato
  • Dried apricots
  • Bananas
  • Yogurt
  • Avocado
  • Mushrooms

 

What about Potassium and alcohol?

Alcohol messes with electrolyte balance, and potassium is one of these important electrolytes. Alcohol suppresses anti-diuretic hormone, throwing this balance off, usually resulting in the loss of potassium. An imbalance can lead to hypertension (high blood pressure).

Specifically when you drink beer, with a higher water content, you manage to retain a lot of this water content. This dilutes your electrolytes and causes you to grow thirsty (not the “I’m lonely and on tinder” thirsty), causing you to drink more even though your body has plenty of excess fluid.

The opposite result happens with liquor. When you drink liquor, you end up peeing out all your fluids and your cells give up the water they are storing to use in your body. This results in true dehydration.

 

Sodium

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Why do you need it?

You probably have become tired of hearing about how sodium will give you high blood pressure and generally wreak havoc on your health. So I’m going to skip that lecture and tell you why you do need sodium in your diet.

Sodium is an electrolyte that functions to maintain blood pressure (hence why too much causes high blood pressure), balances your body’s fluids, and transmits nerve impulses. The recommended daily intake of sodium is 1500 mg per day, even though a teaspoon of salt contains 2300 mg. Sodium also tends to be high in processed foods and restaurants never hold back on the salting. It’s no wonder why we all get too much sodium every day.

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Sodium

  • Table salt
  • Dressings
  • Cured meats and fish
  • Soup
  • Cheese
  • Pickles
  • Salted nuts and seeds
  • Canned vegetables

 

What about Sodium and alcohol?

Many of the symptoms of being hungover can further worsen the losses of sodium caused by alcohol consumption. As you become dehydrated from drinking, you experience sodium losses (another one of those important electrolytes), much like in the same way you lose potassium (due to the diuretic effects of ethanol). The nausea in the morning that usually leads to vomiting results in more fluid and electrolyte loss, including sodium.

 

Magnesium

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Why do you need it?

Magnesium, another important electrolyte, is a cofactor in more than 300 enzymatic reactions.

These enzymatic reactions include muscle and nerve function, protein synthesis, blood sugar control, and blood pressure regulation. Like phosphorus, magnesium also has a role in energy production. Magnesium is mostly stored in the bones and blood levels are regulated by the kidneys. The kidneys excrete magnesium every day through the urine, making daily intakes very important.

Eighty percent of American adults are deficient in this essential mineral.

Magnesium may show promise in improving athletic performance by moving sugar into your muscles and removing lactic acid. Lactic acid is what leaves your sore after a good workout. By lessening the amount of lactic acid left after a workout makes for a better and faster recovery. This means you can get back to the gym quicker!

Low levels of magnesium have been associated with higher rates of depression. Magnesium is involved in many of the brain functions that regulate mood. In modern food today, magnesium levels are much lower today than they used to be and depression rates are much higher today than they used to be. While there are many factors, scientists believe that this relationship is is strong and warrants more research.

Lastly, magnesium may help to prevent the development of type II diabetes. Magnesium deficiency can cause insulin to be less effective at controlling blood sugar.

One study looking at a 20-year period found that those with the highest magnesium intakes had a 47% lower chance of developing type II diabetes.

I think magnesium is a mineral that needs to be the focus of way more research. With so many different important jobs it carries out in the body and the high rate of deficiency in the United States, people need to be made more aware of the importance of getting your daily magnesium intake.

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Magnesium

  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Nuts (Brazil nuts, Almonds, Cashews, Pine Nuts)
  • Seeds (Squash, Pumpkin, Sesame)
  • Mackerel
  • Tuna
  • Beans (Soy, White, Chickpeas, Kidney, Black-eyed peas)
  • Lentils
  • Dried Fruit (Figs, Prunes, Apricots, Dates, Raisins)
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Brown rice
  • Quinoa
  • Avocado

 

What about Magnesium and alcohol?

Again, magnesium losses occur from drinking alcohol because of the diuretic effect. In heavy drinkers, alcohol lowers the magnesium available to the cells through excretion (urine) and leads to deficiency over time. Magnesium deficiency can be seen in about 30% of alcoholics. Due to alcohol’s interference in digestion, magnesium absorption can also be affected.

 

Phosphorus

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Why do you need it?

Phosphorus is the second most abundant mineral in the human body, with calcium being the most abundant. Eighty-five percent of phosphorus is stored in the bones and teeth. Phosphorus helps to filter out waste in the kidneys, helps store and use energy, and is needed for growth and maintenance of tissues.

In the United States, 17% of children and 2% of adults are deficient in phosphorus, which is relatively low due to the many hidden sources of phosphorus in our foods. Sodas, flavored waters, cereal bars, and non-dairy creamer are hidden sources of phosphorus. Getting high amounts of phosphorus is not much of an issue if it is balanced with your intake of calcium. However, high amounts of phosphate without calcium can be toxic.

Too much phosphate can lead to calcification of parts of the cardiovascular system, cause diarrhea, and interfere with the body’s use iron, calcium, magnesium, and zinc.

Phosphorus is very important in making energy for your body. It is a key component in making ATP, the energy molecule your body runs on. The “P” in ATP is a phosphate derived from phosphorus. Phosphorus is like the power lines to a house. They make sure that the house has enough energy to run. Without phosphorus, your body literally could not function!

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Phosphorus

  • Seeds (Pumpkin, Squash, Sunflower, Chia, Sesame, Flax)
  • Salmon
  • Tuna
  • Cheese
  • Shellfish (Scallops, Clams, Shrimp, Mussels, Crab)
  • Pork
  • Beef
  • Nuts (Brazil, Pine nuts, Almonds, Cashews, Pistachios)
  • Tofu
  • Beans (Yellow, White, Chickpeas, Black, Pinto, Kidney)
  • Lentils

 

What about Phosphorus and alcohol?

Alcohol can cause leaching of phosphorous from the bones causing lower levels stored. When this is combined with drinking and the diuretic effect, even more phosphorus can be lost.

 

 

Chloride

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Why do you need it?

Chloride, another electrolyte, is a component of your stomach acid (necessary for digestion), activates intrinsic factor (needed to absorb vitamin B12), helps absorb other minerals, and assists the other electrolytes in sending messages around the body.

Since chloride is a component of table salt, deficiency is very rare in the United States. Due to this relationship, usually if you have high intakes of sodium, you will have high intakes of chloride.

Getting adequate chloride can improve physical fitness because electrolyte balance is essential in good physical performance. Chloride is also brought into the intestine to make for more efficient metabolism. It is also present in the liver to assist in cleansing your food intake and excretion of waste.

Chloride is not talked about often because sodium takes most of the spotlight. More research is needed about chloride in the body when it is not attached to sodium.

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Chloride

  • Salt
  • Seaweed
  • Rye
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Celery
  • Olives

 

What about Chloride and alcohol?

Chloride is another important electrolyte and is affected by alcohol in the same ways that potassium and sodium are. Because of its role in maintaining hydration, heavy drinking can cause a vicious cycle of chloride loss, among the other electrolytes.

 

So What?

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Macro minerals (and minerals in general) do so many different jobs in our bodies and they work closely together to make sure everything runs “business as usual.” Since they work together, being deficient or even having too much of any one mineral can throw off your body’s balance. There is not one more important than another, so getting to know them and whether your diet includes all of them all is so important.

But, the guide doesn’t end here.

There are other minerals in our bodies that we don’t need as much of concentration-wise, but they are equally as important to our bodies from a functionality standpoint. These are called trace minerals.

These trace minerals only make of .01% of your total body weight (in comparison to macro minerals, like calcium and potassium, which make up 1%).

Thinking of it in terms of cocktails, if trace minerals were part of a drink, they would be the bitters.

You can’t make a complete an old fashioned without the addition of bitters. While the drink only needs a couple dashes, without bitters, it is not an old fashioned.

You don’t need to intake all that much of these trace minerals, but you can’t be a healthy you without them.

Let’s get down to business. 

Trace Minerals

 

Fluoride

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Why do you need it?

Fluoride protects teeth from demineralization and can help with damage to tooth enamel. This damage is caused by the combination of sugar and bacteria in the mouth creates damaging acid. This is why dentists hate when kids eat candy…

Much of the tap water in the United States has fluoride added to it. The decision by local governments to fluoridate water has led to a larger discussion over whether this is harmful. When compared to the rest of the world, more people in the U.S. consume fluoridated water than the whole world population combined (97% of Western Europe doesn’t fluoridate their water).

So what are these concerns?

There can be negative side effects from the over-consumption of fluoride. Fluorosis of both the teeth and bones can occur when there is too much fluoride, changing the development and structure of bones and teeth. This can lead to weak and brittle teeth and bones.

Ever wonder why your toothpaste has a label warning you not to accidentally swallow it?

It is because it can be quite toxic in that concentration. To put things into perspective, fluoride has been used for years as an insecticide and rodenticides. Some studies have found that fluoridated water can lead to disruptions in the bones, brain, thyroid gland, pineal gland and even your blood sugar levels.

While a true conclusion about whether or not water should have added fluoride has yet to be made. You may want to consider drinking less tap water in order to avoid some of these less than desirable side-effects. Go bottled, or purchase a fluoride removal system if you can afford it, but make sure your toothpaste includes fluoride. And then… try not to eat it on accident.

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Fluoride

  • Dental Products
  • Processed food and beverage
  • Tea
  • Pesticides (that end up in your fruits and veggies)
  • Mechanically deboned meats (chicken fingers, etc)
  • Teflon Pans

 

What about Fluoride and alcohol?

If the beer you are consuming was made in a city with fluoridated tap water, your beer contains fluoride (so does your soda and teas). Beyond that relationship between alcohol and fluoride, if you consume sugary alcoholic beverages, it will contribute to tooth decay if dental hygiene is not a priority.

 

Iron

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Why do you need it?

Iron’s main function is to carry oxygen throughout the body. Without this essential mineral, your body can’t make enough red blood cells and will leave you anemic. Anemia is the most common blood disorder in the United States, with 3.5 million people affected. Due to menstruation, young women in their childbearing years are much more susceptible to becoming anemic.

Your muscles need iron to contract and stay toned. If you haven’t kept your iron levels adequate, you will become weak and find it hard to move around easily. Twenty percent of your oxygen will be transported to the brain to function normally. Cognitive declines from a lack of oxygen can affect those who can’t maintain their iron stores. The development of dementia later in life can develop with chronically low oxygen to the brain.

Make sure you get enough iron, or you will be like an old lady earlier than you anticipated. No one wants to drag ass all the time and miss out due to anemia-related fatigue…

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Iron

  • Meat (Beef, Lamb)
  • Chicken liver
  • Seafood (Oysters, Mussels, Clams)
  • Poultry
  • Nuts (Cashew, Pine, Hazelnut, Peanut, Almond)
  • Seeds (Squash, Pumpkin, Sesame, Flax)
  • Beans (White, Soy, Garbanzo, Lima, Navy, Black, Pinto)
  • Dark leafy greens
  • Chocolate

 

What about Iron and alcohol?

Iron is not excreted in waste products like many other minerals. When you consume alcohol, your body will store additional iron. This iron gets stored in your organs and can cause iron toxicity, which can increase the number of free-radicals, then increasing cancer risk. While iron deficiency in young women is a concern, in those who are social or heavy drinkers, iron deficiency is less of an issue. If you are a heavy drinker and have the symptoms of low iron, seek out medical advice.

 

Copper

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Why do you need it?

Copper functions to make red blood cells, maintain nerve cells and keeps your immune system strong. Like some of the other minerals, copper has antioxidant properties to protect against free radicals. Iron and copper are also good friends, with copper’s ability to help the body better absorb iron. While 25% of the U.S. population doesn’t get enough copper in their diet every day, the human body needs so little that deficiency is not very common.

If you find out you are anemic from a lack of iron, the addition of a copper supplement may also be a good idea since it helps iron absorption. There may a mental health component to your copper needs. It is involved in the enzymatic reactions needed to produce melatonin (helps you fall asleep) and serotonin (what makes you happy).

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Copper

  • Seafood (Oyster, Squid, Lobster, Crab, Octopus)
  • Kale
  • Mushrooms
  • Seeds (Sesame, Sunflower, Pumpkin, Squash, Flax)
  • Nuts (Cashew, Hazelnut, Brazil nut, Walnuts, Pine nuts, Pistachios, Pecans, Almonds)
  • Beans (Chickpeas, Soybeans, Kidney, White)
  • Avocado
  • Dried fruit (Prunes, Apricots, Currants, Peaches, Raisins, Figs)

 

What about Copper and alcohol?

Consumption of alcohol significantly decreases copper in the blood stream, but does not increase excretion. However, there becomes a buildup of copper in the liver. This excess can cause liver damage, which as a heavy drinker, you can’t really afford…

 

Zinc

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Why do you need it?

Zinc has a wide variety of functions in the body that include fighting bacteria and viruses, making genetic material, helps in wound healing, and maintains your sense of smell and taste. Of course being the foodie that I am, I MUST highlight zinc’s role in smell and taste. Zinc helps to produce an enzyme called carbonic anhydrase (CA) VI, which allows you to taste and smell.

Not to scare you, but some studies have shown a correlation between loss of sense of smell and an increased risk of mortality. Not too shocking when you look at the side effects of zinc deficiency. Without adequate zinc, your immune system weakens, your mood and sleep patterns can become disturbed, and its antioxidant properties can’t function to prevent cancer.

Some research also suggests that zinc lozenges can help you get over the common cold and reduce symptoms if taken within the first 24 hours. When you feel that post-rager cold coming on be sure to get some zinc, it may save you some stuffy-nosed grief!

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Zinc

  • Seafood (Oysters, Crab, Lobster)
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Wheat Germ
  • Seeds (Pumpkin, Squash, Sesame, Sunflower, Chia, Flax)
  • Nuts (Cashews, Pine nuts, Pecans, Almonds, Walnuts, Hazelnuts)
  • Peanuts
  • Spinach
  • Pork
  • Chicken
  • Beans (Chickpeas, Baked beans, Kidney)
  • Cocoa/Chocolate
  • Mushrooms

 

What about Zinc and alcohol?

Zinc and alcohol have a fascinating relationship. Zinc in recent studies has been shown to increase the liver’s antioxidant capabilities. It has also been found to protect the digestive tract, liver, and babies in the womb from the negative effects of alcohol (with supplementation). Low zinc levels can cause thyroid issues that eventually lead to weight gain. Supplementation may be a necessary step since alcohol also depletes zinc stores.

Such a wacky relationship if you ask me…

 

Manganese

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Why do you need it?

Manganese derives its name from the Greek word for ‘magic,’ which remains appropriate since we are still trying to understand what it does for the body. Scientists determined in the 1930s that humans need small amounts of manganese every day.

In the mitochondria, the part of the cell that produces energy for our bodies, there is a lot of cellular respiration putting the mitochondria at risk for oxidative damage. Manganese acts as an antioxidant, protecting the energy-production ‘factory’ from becoming damaged. Manganese has many small but key roles as a cofactor in the formation of healthy bone and cartilage, as part of enzymes needed in all macronutrient (proteins, carbohydrates, fats) metabolism, and is involved in making an amino acid available for collagen production needed to heal wounds.

It’s important to note that when manganese is consumed in the presence of iron, magnesium, and calcium, manganese absorption is decreased.

So many complicated interactions between all the minerals! It is amazing that our bodies manage to function so well all the time…

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Manganese

  • Seafood (Mussels, Clams, Crayfish)
  • Nuts (Hazelnuts, Pecans, Walnuts, Macadamia, Almond, Cashews, Pistachios)
  • Seeds (Pumpkin, Chia, Sesame, Flax, Sunflower)
  • Bread
  • Tofu
  • Beans (Butter, Lima, Chickpeas, White, Black-eyed, Kidney)
  • Brown rice
  • Quinoa
  • Buckwheat
  • Fish (Bass, Trout)
  • Spinach
  • Black tea

 

What about Manganese and alcohol?

A negative interaction has been studied between manganese, alcohol, and poor mood outcomes. Feelings of depression, anxiety, anger, fatigue, and confusion in the presence of high alcohol and high manganese was found to be significantly different from those who had low manganese. This is due to alcohol causing manganese neurotoxicity in the brain. The problem here is the increased absorption of manganese caused by alcohol consumption.

We are so used to learning that alcohol causes deficiency, but sometimes there are exceptions and the effects can be terrible. Just something to keep in mind…

 

Selenium

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Why do you need it?

Selenium is a mineral with antioxidant properties and plays a key role in metabolism. The heaviest concentration of selenium is in your thyroid and helps to make thyroid hormone. In the process of making thyroid hormone, that magical hormone that helps regulate your weight, a lot of free-radical activity occurs, and selenium is needed to neutralize the damage. Over time, your thyroid will age from this oxidation and become less active, which leads to weight gain.

There is yet to be much research published on the long-term health benefits of selenium. Only its role in thyroid health has been confirmed. Many scientists are looking into selenium’s effects on cancer development, cognition, and cardiovascular health.

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Selenium

  • Nuts (Brazil nuts, Cashews, Macadamia)
  • Seafood (Oysters, Mussels, Lobster, Clams, Shrimp, Squid)
  • Tuna
  • Swordfish
  • Seeds (Sunflower, Chia, Flax, Pumpkin)
  • Pork
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Poultry
  • Mushrooms
  • Whole grain bread
  • BEER! (really check out more about it here!)

 

What about Selenium and alcohol?

Selenium is often low in those who consume alcohol often. Low selenium status has been correlated with an increased risk of liver cancer. Selenium has antioxidant properties and without sufficient intakes, it can’t protect against cancer-causing free radicals.

 

Molybdenum

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Why do you need it?

I know, I know…Moly – what – bdenum? You may have never heard of this mineral. And currently, molybdenum is still a bit of a mystery to most researchers and health professionals.

What we do know is that molybdenum helps iron get utilized to make hemoglobin, the compound that carries our oxygen on red blood cells.

Come to think of it, so many of these trace minerals play a role in assisting iron, almost like little servants.

When you are metabolizing protein and carbohydrate, your body produces uric acid waste, which molybdenum has a role in forming. Those with gout, caused by uric acid imbalance, may benefit from molybdenum supplementation. In some places where molybdenum is nearly absent in soils, the rate of certain cancers have been observed to be higher.

Like selenium, more research into the role of molybdenum needs to be studied. Who knows if it could be the secret to being young FOREVER. We can dream right?

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Molybdenum

  • Lentils
  • Dried Peas
  • Beans (Lima, Kidney, Soy, Black, Pinto, Garbanzo)
  • Oats
  • Barley
  • Tomatoes
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Cucumber
  • Celery

 

What about Molybdenum and alcohol?

Molybdenum plays an important role in the breakdown of acetaldehyde, the toxic product of alcohol metabolism. It is also a cofactor in the enzymatic pathways of your liver than nullifies sulfites that would otherwise be destructive to your organs. For this reason, a molybdenum deficiency is dangerous to those who consume alcohol often. If all the acetaldehyde is just sitting around it will not only cause damage, but leave you more hungover.

 

Iodine

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Why do you need it?

Hanging out with selenium at CLUB THYROID is iodine. Holla! 

Iodine also helps in the production of thyroid hormone. Iodine combines with the amino acid tyrosine to make the two types of thyroid medicine. Without iodine, your thyroid will become enlarged (goiter) and your thyroid activity will drop. This can have both metabolic and neurological consequences.

Iodine deficiency until recently had become a thing of the past in the United States.

But before the last couple decades, flour used to make most bread had iodine, but has since been replaced with bromide (produces better bread). Iodized table salt is no longer mandated and we are beginning to see more people with iodine deficiency. Even worse, the bromide in flour may be blocking iodine absorption. In the last 30 years, iodine intakes have been estimated to have dropped in the U.S. by 50%!

Iodine may play a role in preventing breast cancer.

Those who were diagnosed with breast cancer in one study were found to have lower iodine levels in their breast tissue than those without cancer. In countries with higher intakes of iodine, women have a reduced risk of developing breast cancer. If getting iodine would help the odds of saving boobies from cancer, it is time to better understand iodine and get more of it!

 

Where do you get it?

Good sources of Iodine

  • Seaweed
  • Scallops
  • Cod
  • Yogurt
  • Shrimp
  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Salmon
  • Tuna
  • Iodized Salt (read this if you’re curious about whether you should buy iodized or non-iodized salt)

 

What about Iodine and alcohol?

There is not much literature out there about the relationship between iodine and alcohol consumption. However, one study suggests that those who consume more alcohol actually develop fewer goiters, the enlargement of the thyroid due to iodine deficiency. The study specifically looked at wine and beer, so it is unclear if liquor consumption would result in the same findings.

 

“Trace” does not mean less important

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Just because these minerals are not needed in high amounts, doesn’t mean their role in your body are less important than those compounds you need more of. So many of these trace minerals work in conjunction with the other minerals that you need in order to keep your body fully functional. 

Just like on a sports team, every player in the game has an important role, even if some players spend more time active in the game…

It’s funny though…

So many of the trace minerals on this list need to be researched even more in order to find out the true nature of their functionality, benefits, and potential. We can thank technology and scientists for continuing to unveil the undiscovered benefits of all the nutrients that help our bodies work every day.

You never know when there will be a discovery that will change the way we eat forever.

Just something to think about…

Now, I only really covered the essentials here. We are actually learning more and more about minerals through new research all the time! If you have any questions, please tweet me, leave a comment, or message me on Instagram and I’d be happy to answer any of your questions.

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About Kaitlin Cushman


Welcome to Nutrition Gone Wild. I'm Kaitlin, I have 2 degrees in nutrition, and I want to make a promise to you: I'm going to offer advice that is easy, beneficial, and applicable to your everyday life. This advice is meant to empower you to make these small changes that ultimately will benefit your overall health without taking the fun out of your daily schedule. Join me on this journey to living health(ier), wild and free!

Being healthy doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy a good cocktail…

12 Guilt Free Cocktail Recipes with Kaitlin Cushman

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Half the calories, all the fun.